September in Seattle Gardens

September in Seattle Gardens

September 9, 2010

The rose scent was heavy in the cool, breezeless morning air despite fading petals and spent leaves.  The summer’s prolific showcase of color and texture now only a pleasant memory for the rose lover.  Dew slid ever so slowly, edging downward into the intricately deep-ringed pockets on the few remaining buds and blossoms in the 2.5 acres of Seattle’s Woodland Park Rose Garden.  Only one of two dozen certified American Rose Test Gardens in the United States until 2010, the garden provides free rose displays in one of the optimum growing environments in the world.

With 280 varieties and over 5,000 plants, the garden flaunts new rose hybrids prior to becoming available for rose lovers. Through the efforts of the Seattle Lion’s Club and Rose Society, the rose garden bloomed formally in 1922.   Currently, the garden has had an architectural face life and several restored pieces have been brought back to life.  The garden’s extensive array of bush roses, hybrid teas, miniatures, climbers, tree roses, and All-America test varieties blends elegantly with the garden’s formal architectural design to create a memorable showcase landscape.

Strolling and occasionally stopping quietly along the grassy paths in regal garden splendor, my hour and half among the remaining rose petals was a welcome relief from hours of traveling cooped inside a stuffy Ford pickup.  I can still whiff the rose perfumed air even as I write and remember, drenched both in dew and fragrance, totally absorbed in the moment. Each bloom captured through the lens, now a special friend and gift to share with you.

Washington Park Japanese Garden  http://www.theseattlejapanesegarden.com/
(click on trail, garden, plant info—bottom lower left—for extensive garden  details…even an audio tour…excellent site)

How much beauty can one absorb in an hour?  Seattle’s Japanese Garden symbolizes a compact seasonal world of mountains, forests, lakes, rivers, tablelands, and a village, with each feature voicing a quiet narrative.  An environment of muted tranquility and serenity, where silence articulates through the shades of greens, reds, golds, and yellows.  The placement of plants meant to suggest the wildness of nature, sense of motion, and the passage of time.

Palettes of color, symbolism—each featured with every meticulously designed path, directing the participant into tradition and inspiring the senses.  For one hour we slowed our pace, meandered the winding paths of subdued beauty, and focused on our intimate surroundings…undisturbed.  My husband found a shady spot on a bench overlooking one of the lakes while I immersed myself in a photography blitz.  Now one year later I continue to live in the silent moments of those thoughts and heartbeats with my Lord and the hint of autumn’s creativity through the images below.

Stroll through these two Seattle gardens at www.corinthrose.com under Travel. 

Check back for my next two posts:  Knee Deep in cypress knees, part 1 and 2.  Be blessed.

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About corinthrose

Born again Christian, helpmate of 42 years, domestic engineer of two children, GRANDmother of six darlings, professional volunteer, fanatic photographer, and a wanna be writer. Occasionally, infatuated with family history, flower photography, and traveling with my hiking buddy.
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One Response to September in Seattle Gardens

  1. What memories your photos of the Japanese Garden brings back. I have some of the same shots taken at a different time of the year. Missed the Rose Garden. I think it’d be worth a trip back next year to visit it! Great blog post.

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